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CRTC Conference Video Showcase

Here, you can find links to the various videos we exhibited at the 2013 CRT Transit Conference in Buffalo, NY, September 14, 2013.
Each listing gives you the runtime for the video.

1. Moving Beyond the Automobile: Transit Oriented Development (3:18).

http://vimeo.com/19836629#at=0
After the light rail is extended, businesses move in, followed by people. Note that in Jersey City car ownership is even lower than in Buffalo!

2. William Lind: A Conservative Voice For Public Transportation by Elizabeth Press on November 12, 2009 (3:21).

http://vimeo.com/12743336#at=0
Transit expansion is not just a green issue. The business perspective is presented here.

3. Active Living For All Ages: Creating Neighborhoods Around Transit by Robin

Urban Smith on April 17, 2012 (6:40). http://www.amara.org/en/videos/WQu2IVetxYLy/info/
Seniors need to be near transit to continue active living. This has benefits for everyone.

4. Phoenix's METRO Light Rail Takes Flight by Clarence Eckerson, Jr. on June 17, 2009 (3:21).

http://vimeo.com/12745105#at=0
Planning for large increases in population.

5. Take a Ride on the Seattle Streetcar by Clarence Eckerson, Jr. on March 10, 2009 (3:58).

http://vimeo.com/12796321#at=0
The new streetcar line connects to rail and to interesting neighborhoods.

6. Transit Oriented Development (14:27).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-9jhf55Wuw
In Southern California, from Los Angeles to Pasadena and beyond into the foothills, new transit lines have produced a ripple effect, stimulating housing, retail, and commercial development. People have access to jobs, shopping, and the arts within a short walk.

Transportation: WNY Path to the Future - a Forum

League of Women Voters Buffalo-Niagara presents

"Transportation: WNY Path to the Future"

May 9, 2012, 4-6 pm, Harlem Road Community Center, 4255 Harlem Road, Amherst, NY

Forum will offer steps to take now, to foster sustainable transportation for the future in WNY.

Panelists: Amy Weymouth-Michaux and Kelly Dixon, transportation analysts with the Greater Buffalo Niagara Regional Transportation Council; Dr. Wende A. Mix, Buffalo State professor in Planning; Senator Timothy M. Kennedy, 58th District, member NYS Senate Transportation and Commerce and Agriculture committees; Hon. Sam Hoyt, Empire State Development Corporation, former NYS Assemblyman

Moderator: Gladys Gifford, President, Citizens for Regional Transit
Discussion to follow presentations by panel. Event is free and open to the public.

Time to Act Now to Protect Public Transit

Let's put the pressure on the NYS legislature, using every tool at our
disposal, to urge increased NYS funding for public transit!

Below is a link to two on-line petitions now circulating. The link is
from a blog by New York State Transportation Equity Alliance (CRT is a
member). Within that blog there is a link to NYS Sen. Grisanti's
petition.

http://org2.democracyinaction.org/o/5443/p/dia/action/public/?action_KEY...

The Most Common Metro Rail Myths

MYTH 1: "WHAT WE'VE DONE SO FAR IS A FAILURE."

FACT: For a system of its limited size, Metro Rail has been very successful. Metro Rail ridership is higher than ridership of equally small rail systems in other cities. For example, Sacramento has three times as much rail mileage as we do and carries two-thirds as many riders.

MYTH 2: "ANYTHING MORE WE DO WILL BE A FAILURE, BECAUSE MIDDLE-CLASS COMMUTERS WILL NEVER USE PUBLIC TRANSIT."

FACT: Where transit service is good, people use it. At one end of the spectrum, cities with excellent rail service, like New York, have higher transit ridership than Buffalo (over 50% of New Yorkers use a train or bus to get to work). By contrast, cities with even less transit service than Buffalo (including Sunbelt cities like Houston) have even lower ridership than Buffalo. It logically follows that Americans will use public transit if it is convenient for them.

MYTH 3: "BECAUSE ALL NEW JOBS ARE IN THE SUBURBS, WE DON'T NEED PUBLIC TRANSIT ANY MORE."

FACT: In fact, public transit is more necessary now than ever, for two reasons. First, welfare reform will force the carless poor to go to work, and we need public transit to get them to work. Second, the growing number of older Americans will increase the number of people who are physically unable to drive.

MYTH 4: "BUFFALO IS ALREADY SO SPREAD OUT THAT PUBLIC TRANSIT IS INEFFICIENT."

FACT: Buffalo is more densely populated than cities with higher transit ridership. For example, the city of Buffalo is twice as densely populated as the city of Atlanta -- yet Atlanta's transit ridership is higher (about 20% of city residents use public transit to get to work, as opposed to about 15% of Buffalo residents). It logically follows that if our mass transit service equalled that of Atlanta, our ridership would be higher.

MYTH 5: "WE CAN NEVER BRING METRO RAIL TO THE SUBURBS BECAUSE SUBURBANITES ARE AGAINST IT."

FACT: In a WGRZ-TV telephone poll, 80% of metro area residents stated that they favor Metro Rail expansion. And in a 1994 Goldhaber Associates poll, 59.6% of Amherst residents endorsed expansion of Metro Rail into Amherst.

MYTH #6: "THERE'S NO POINT IN SUBSIDIZING METRO RAIL BECAUSE IT DOESN'T PAY FOR ITSELF."

FACT: This argument overlooks two facts. First, almost no other government service is expected to pay for itself -- not food stamps, not public housing, not the Pentagon. Second, mass transit doesn't just benefit the riders who pay for it: it benefits the public as a whole by reducing pollution, traffic, and welfare dependency. It follows that the public as a whole should help pay for it.

MYTH #7: "BUSES ARE MORE EFFICIENT THAN RAIL SERVICE, SO LET'S END THE RAIL SERVICE AND BRING BACK THE BUSES."

FACT: Metro Rail has consistently carried about 25% more passengers than did the buses, and has maintained ridership to a greater extent than buses. Moreover, trains cut the bus travel time in half, adhere more regularly to their timetable, and are more dependable in bad weather.

MYTH #8: "HIGHWAYS ARE MORE POPULAR AND EFFECTIVE NATION-WIDE THAN MASS TRANSIT."

FACT: click here to hear otherwise!Page 1 Page 2

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